What exercises are compatible with Atlas?

Updated 5 months ago by Peter Li

There are countless exercises and every one of them can be logged with the Atlas through a variety of ways.

Strength training

Repetitious exercises

This is our bread and butter – repetitious exercises are fitness motions that have a repetitive component to it and can be automatically sensed by Atlas products. For example, push-ups have a distinct "start" and "end" to a single repetition – Atlas senses your body's motion in 3 dimensions to identify the exercise and logs each time a full rep is completed automatically. This includes a wide range of exercises from Barbell Overhead Squats to Dumbbell Reverse Lunges.

In unguided (freestyle) workouts, you can complete any exercise in the workout, in any order, any number of times, while Atlas automatically senses which exercise you are performing, counts repetitions, and analyzes your biometrics. Learn more about standard guided and unguided workouts.

Isometric exercises

Isometric exercises can be logged with Atlas products. Isometric exercises are contractions of a particular muscle or group of muscles – however, during isometric exercises, the muscle does not noticeably change length and the affected joints does not move. For example, a Plank Hold or Wall Sit are isometric exercises. Since your body does not move in 3 dimensions, these exercises are not automatically sensed and instead you can manually log isometric exercises with Atlas.

Leg isolation exercises

Leg isolation exercises can be logged with Atlas products. Leg isolation exercises are exercises that are repetitious but the motion is isolated from the Atlas product, for example, Seated Leg Extensions. These exercises are not automatically sensed and instead you can manually log leg isolation exercises with Atlas.

Aerobic exercise

Repetitious exercises

Repetitious aerobic exercises – like a stair master or elliptical – are fitness motions that have a repetitive component to it and can be automatically sensed by Atlas products. For example, an elliptical "step" has a distinct "start" and "end" to a single repetition – Atlas senses your body's motion in 3 dimensions to identify the exercise and logs each time a full rep is completed automatically.

Non-repetitious exercises

Non-repetitious aerobic exercises – like tennis or soccer – are exercises that are generally random. These exercises can be logged with Atlas sport modes.

Stretching

Stretching – like Standing Hamstring Stretch or a Lunge with Spinal Twist – can be logged with Atlas products. Stretching is very similar to isometric exercises – while stretching, the muscle does not noticeably change length and the affected joints does not move too significantly. Since your body does not move in 3 dimensions, these exercises are not automatically sensed and instead you can manually log stretching with Atlas.


How did we do?


Powered by HelpDocs