Improve rep counting accuracy

Updated 4 months ago by Peter Li

Atlas rep counting accuracy and reliability is dependent on the quality of the recordings. The form you record will define what is Sensed and what Atlas considers a “complete repetition”.

Many factors in your recording will impact the performance:

  • Form and Fatigue
  • Number of recorded repetitions
  • Tempo
  • Load
Atlas always recommends proper form. Please always consult your physician before you begin to use Atlas products. Your risk of injury increases greatly with unsupervised training.

Form

The most important variable is your form. Atlas rep counting analyzes your motion in 3D space and uses the path the Multi-Trainer 3 sensor makes in 3D space to identify your exercises. The form you use in your recordings will be your “gold standard”. Your Sensing accuracy will be lower if your actual form in your workout degrades from the form in your recordings.

If You Are Strict On Form

If you are strict on form, only include perfect form recordings in your calibration. This way, as your form degrades, poor form reps will be excluded from your workout log because they do not match the recordings in your calibration.

If You Are Flexible On Form

If you are flexible on form, include both perfect and imperfect form recordings in your calibration. This way as your form degrades, both perfect and imperfect reps will be included in your workout log.

Number Of Recorded Repetitions

The number of repetitions you declare for a recording is crucial for accurate Atlas rep counting. It’s important to keep your counting methodology consistent. Accurate recordings will directly impact the accuracy of the repetition counting.

Some exercises have different ways to count. Let’s consider Alternating Right/Left Forward Lunge. Some of us count a rep each time you step forward with the Right leg (“slow count”). Some of us count a rep each time you step forward with either leg (“fast count”).

Both of these counting methodologies are correct and are compatible with the Atlas Body System. The important part is that you are consistent in your recordings. If your recordings count with a “fast count,” then the calibrated exercise will count reps using the “fast count”. Typically, Atlas recommends using a “fast count”.

Tempo

The tempo of your motion can also impact your calibration. Similar to perfect and imperfect form, completing reps at a tempo that’s much slower or much faster than your recordings may not be Sensed. To capture a broader tempo range with Atlas rep counting, include recordings of a variety of tempos.

There is a minimum tempo limit. Typically, you must complete the concentric and eccentric contraction within 4 seconds. (Note: The minimum tempo limit is more strict with smaller motions. For example, for push-ups and other similar “small motion” exercises the minimum tempo limit is closer to 2 or 3 seconds. For burpees and other similar “large motion” exercises” the minimum tempo limit is closer to 6 or 7 seconds.) Exercises with extremely slow concentric or eccentric contraction phases beyond the minimum tempo limit may be considered isometric. Learn more about tracking extremely slow tempo exercises with Manual Exercises.

Load

The load you use can also impact your calibration. The load you use can greatly impact your form and how your body adjusts to lift the load and put the load back down. Not all repetitions may be logged if you are using a load much lighter than the load used during you recordings.

If You Are Strict On Form

If you are strict on form, only include perfect form using a variety of loads in your recordings. This way, as you increase load and your form changes, heavy load form reps will be included in your workout log because they do not match the recordings in your calibration.

If You Are Flexible On Form

If you are flexible on form, include both perfect and imperfect form recordings with a variety of loads in your calibration. This way as your form degrades as you push your limits, both perfect and imperfect reps will be included in your workout log.


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